wearemostaliveindreams:

Noise eating
desperate
pinches of
sunbathing palms,
turning this
way or that, inside
or out, or pushing
against another
lone limitation
on real color.

Smiling faces
in reflections
distorted
to beige
scaffolding
crawling with sway
and taunt with wit
sunken eyes,
slipping to snare
meaning from

It’s when the little moments are encapsulated in writing that they reveal their importance.

Respect to WeAreMostAliveInDreams for this…

This is pretty much our problem in a nutshell.

(Source: memewhore)

Metropolis, IL

Either this place exists or I had a crazy ass dream while driving through Illinois.

inkymole:

…and the AA side. Both these pieces appear as a detachable print folded round the 12” sized artwork for the release, which comes with a 45rpm adapter.

Official Dates for Sage Francis’ #CopperGone Tour with B. Dolan & Special Guests

sir-thursday:

folknpotatoes:

Transcendence suffered from the same weaknesses in storytelling that most of the mortality-evading/singularity science-fiction films made within the last three years all seem to have: making the brilliant central themes and universal truths get lost in the discarded piles of techno-babble that are…

I agreed until the end because that’s literally what he did when they plugged him in

[Hey! Thanks for the reply. I always appreciate someone taking the time to read something off my blog.]

With regard to the idea of transcendence:
Outside of the structure of the film, I don’t think the movie never actually did that. I was actually being quite literal about the meaning not in the context of the film. Sure they showed him “transcending” their technology, their barriers and their fear, but I was referring to the aftermath of the movie. Nothing transcended the screen in a way that made me take away a new message or some kind of modern philosophy about where we find ourselves as a species. A general message of peril or foreboding in light of our technological attachments seems a bit bland for as grandiose as the film was aspiring to be.

(I also felt the direction lacking. The director really liked his macro shots and his slow motion… but that’s another story altogether. Ha)

Transcendence suffered from the same weaknesses in storytelling that most of the mortality-evading/singularity science-fiction films made within the last three years all seem to have: making the brilliant central themes and universal truths get lost in the discarded piles of techno-babble that are continually spoon-fed and reiterated and reinforced using unnecessary explanatory scenes.

To make the clearest analogy, it’s the difference between The Matrix and The Matrix: Revolutions.

The ideas were tremendous. The commentary was inspired. I’d say the insight into our lives and the irony of living the way we do was all in there too, but the execution of it all felt flat and anti-climactic.

The “transcendence” the movie kept promising never happened.